Monday, April 9, 2012

Curtaining skirt

It looks plain, but my new skirt has one fun and unusual little fact about its origins.
The fabric was part of the bundle of fabrics given to me by my friend C from her late mother's stash.  That's not the unusual little fact, btw...  actually, it seems like a lot of my new item posts start out with that statement, and yes, I fully appreciate my very lovely friend to give to me such a marvellous gift of fabric, and I am roaring through it at a most satisfying rate! Since using up this little bit I still have about four or five choice pieces left...
But about this piece; it is curtaining fabric.  Complete with the rubber black-out backing and all...  I know, right?!  cue images of sister Maria ripping down the nursery curtains in the Sound of  Music...  but waste not want not, hmm?  There was only quite a small piece of it, which along with the heavy texture dictated a skirt.
I decided to use my latest favourite skirt pattern, the one from Vogue 1247.  Every version of this skirt I have seen on the internet is extremely cute, and I can sense this is going to become another staple pattern for me too...  I love the way it is just like an ordinary little skirt, but has those fabulously unexpected pockets in the front.  Who would have thought pockets in such an unlikely place could be so successful?!
A commenter noted that one couldn't put anything bulky in the pockets, and I agree, but really you couldn't put pockets anywhere on a little skirt like this and expect them to carry very much.  They are just about the best pockets one could even think of for a silhouette like this, imo.  I reckon this was a stroke of genius on the part of the designer.  They are perfectly fine for a hanky, a credit card, a mobile phone, and a house key, and really; what more does a lady need?
I added about 10cm to the length of the lower skirt pieces, and flared them just very slightly towards the hemline (approx 1.5cm each side?); and still managed to get all the main pieces of the skirt out of the piece of fabric, but I had to cut the waistband out of other fabric.  For this I used heavy and stiff delustred satin (leftover from my trench coat), and I also had to piece together the pocket lining with some of this same fabric.  The skirt is lined with the leftover poly satin that was also used to line my ivory trench coat... so really, the skirt is like part of a matching set with that trench coat!
Because the curtain fabric is really quite heavy, I hemmed with a strip of bias cut cotton; meaning less bulk because I didn't have to turn the fabric under twice, plus a longer skirt.  Given how tiny this skirt is already, I was aiming to get as much length as possible here!
Given my mad passion for ivory and other neutrals, methinks this is going to become a much worn little thing this winter...  bring it on!


Details:
Skirt; Vogue 1247 lengthened and lined, heavy cream curtaining fabric, ivory delustred satin waistband, ivory satin lining, my review of this pattern here
Shirt; Burda 7767 modified, khaki linen, details here
Sandals; akiel, from an op shop

28 comments:

  1. Love that skirt and fantastic idea to use curtaining. I have that pattern and some satin backed upholstery/curtain fabric that might just be long enough for a skirt. Must go and measure up, it won't matter if I match a lampshade, will it?

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  2. What a great skirt. I love that pattern one day I will make it. I can never seem to find pretty curtain fabrics but I do keep looking.

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  3. Love it! It makes me think of my stash that I can now get my hands on... Wonder if I've got any leftover curtain fabric?

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  4. Great skirt - I've seen so many great versions. I love the way you've used up lots of small pieces of fabric to make it.

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  5. Back when women's dresses all had pockets in the seams I always carried a hankie and my lipstick. In the temperatures you reported a lipstick would likely melt if you carried it around!

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  6. Great skirt and I love that it's rubber backed curtain fabric.

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  7. I love the idea of wide pockets hidden in seams; i can imagine doing color blocking in this skirt pattern and my darling daughter loves her pockets more than her skirts! Thanks for the inspiration Carolyn, hope to knock this pattern soon; will keep you posted.

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  8. Love this skirt and LOVE your version! I made one for my little sister for Christmas in denim and have been meaning to make myself one too.... Such a cute cut and I really love the little modifications you did with the flare and satin waistband.

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  9. That is a cute little skirt!

    Thanks for your comment---I love the idea of a seafoam green trench! :)

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  10. Another great version of this skirt. It could become my favorite pattern as well. Nice choice for this textured fabric and the ivory looks great with your long tan legs:)

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  11. Very nice skirt and what a neat ,neat seamstress you are!

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  12. Clever! And hey, you won't have to worry about lack of opacity on a light-colored skirt. ;)

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  13. I love your skirt. I have this pattern for a skirt for my daughter. When I think of curtain fabric made into clothes, I remember Carol Burnett doing a skit mocking Scarlett O'Hara's green velvet curtain dress (in a costume designed by the legendary Bob Mackie). Hysterical!

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  14. I like the placement of the pockets. I want to see this paired with the new Trench.

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  15. What a wonderful skirt! Those pockets are perfect. Hmm - perhaps I need one of these?

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  16. Love the setting of your photo. Those gum trees are the best. Your skirt is lovely as well. You are so creative when it comes to getting the MOST out of a piece of fabric---and then adding another "something" when you don't have quite enough! Kudos!

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  17. A very innovative skirt - those pockets are so unusual. I would be very proud of anything resembling Sound of Music chic - the play costumes may have been curtains but they were impeccably tailored.

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  18. Great skirt - I love the pocket position (a bit like a waitress style apron pocket?)The reference to 'Sound of Music' made me laugh! I think all fabric should be considered no matter what its 'real' purpose is - you get some great surprises that way. Well done!

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  19. The skirt looks awesome! I can't beleive it's made out of curtain fabric! You're right, waste not, want not!

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  20. Great skirt! The flare towards the hemline gives it a nice shape too.
    I started sewing again after attending a skirt company trunk show which featured dozens of expensive skirts made from curtain fabric...... and they were selling like crazy!

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  21. I love this skirt! the colour is lovely too.

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  22. I have some lovely floral 1950's fabric that I have been tempted to make into a skirt but haven't had the nerve yet....you may have inspired me.

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  23. I like the very subtle contrast of the waistband - another one of your genius design details. And frankly, it seems that pockets in the front would be less detrimental to one's silhouette - so smart.

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  24. That really is a classic skirt with such a good little pocket detail
    I have never considered it because of the length, but by adding a few inches it makes it much more versatile.

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  25. I don't think I can hold out much longer - I need this pattern! That is a great skirt!

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  26. This is a great second 1247! And you do realize that I frankenpatterned my TNT dress pattern with the bottom of the V1247 skirt to get my second verion of the Rachel Dress? I love those hidden skirt pockets!

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  27. That skirt is a keeper! Very cute!

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