Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Burda 7767; a rogue's gallery

A while ago, Myrna suggested that I do something about rounding up together in one post the number of variations on a pattern that I have made up; as a sort of "hey, look at the number of different looks you can get from just one pattern" kind of a post.  Thank you, Myrna!
I thought it was a terrific suggestion, as I do re-use favourite patterns a whole bunch of times, probably painfully and boringly so from the point of view of people who like to go for new and exciting patterns with every garment.  But to redeem the boredom of going again and again with the same old same old patterns I usually introduce a little something to a pattern to get slightly different garments each and every time.
One pattern I have used a lot is Burda 7767, a basic men's shirt pattern.  Now agreed, it's very basic, and seamstresses after a challenging sew usually avoid basic patterns like the plague.  Advanced seamstresses often prefer to go for something with a few exciting variations or twists already incorporated in it.  But just think, a basic pattern is often the best for playing around with and once you have mastered basic sewing techniques you can introduce your own features.  So much more fun!  I do prefer DIY-ing my own features to being spoon-fed a design; and from the sewing-challenge point of view incorporating your own ideas can be a bigger challenge than even the toughest Vogue Advanced pattern, and you will feel more like an actual "designer" in control of your own ideas.
Most of the shirts I have made from this pattern have been for the menfolk in my life; my husband and my two sons.  OK, I admit I have also made one version for me too, hehe...  and unfortunately men love for their stuff to be kinda unadorned.  But you can still squeeze a few little variations in here and there and as long as it is not too asymmetric or "weird" your menfolk will probably consent to wear it...
So here, without further ado, is my gallery of Burda 7767 (so far...)


The first version: just to the pattern with no bells or whistles, pink linen, navy blue topstitching and navy blue buttons.  I was sewing this one as a birthday surprise so couldn't do any actual fitting.  It turned out a tad too tight under the arms for Craig, but not to worry, Tim has it in his wardrobe (he is not the kind of guy who feels his masculinity is challenged by a pink shirt) and I have borrowed it tonnes of times too.
Version two; maroon linen, with black contrasting topstitching and buttons.  Variations, a curved pocket flap, curved pocket edges, narrow spaced double rows topstitching.  I've also borrowed this one on a few occasions, hehe (it's a good thing my husband is so generous with his wardrobe, hmmm?)
Version three; blue linen with light brown contrasting topstitching and light brown mottley bone buttons.  Variations, arrowhead pocket flap, curved pocket edges, wider spaced double topstitching.
Version four; for Sam, turquoise and white striped cotton with contrasting navy blue topstitching and navy blue snaps.  Variations; double bias placed breast pockets with arrowhead bias placed pocket flaps, shoulder tabs, inner sleeve tabs (so the sleeves can be rolled up like pictured) and snap closures throughout.
Version five; for Tim, blue, black and white plaid flannelette, with navy topstitching and navy blue snaps.  Variations, pieced pocket pieces (to take advantage of that interesting plaid), bias placed arrowhead pocket flaps. shoulder tabs, inner sleeve tabs and snap closure throughout.
Version six; for Craig, white linen, white topstitching and buttons. Variations; one double welt breast pocket with looped button closure, no collar, curved lower hemline.  Yup, I've borrowed this one a tonne too...!
Version seven; (blush) for me..., blue cotton chambray, white topstitching and copper-toned snaps.  Variations, double breast pockets with arrowhead pocket flaps, shoulder tabs and inner sleeve tabs, curved lower hemline.
Version eight; for Craig, navy and white striped cotton, yellow cotton, white topstitching and yellow buttons.  Variations, contrasting fabric for collar stand lining and sleeve cuff lining.  Buttonholes sewn on the diagonal, and grouped together down the buttonband in pairs, curved lower hemline.
Version nine; for Craig, green shot cotton, contrasting yellow topstitching, brown mottley buttons.  Variations, of summer weight cotton, with short sleeves, double curved edge breast pockets, arrowhead pocket flaps, curved lower hemline.  Did an interesting little triangular cut-out feature thingy on the ends of the sleeves
Version ten; for Tim, beige, black and white irregularly striped "scrunched" cotton, with black topstitching and black snaps.  Variations,  sleeve tabs, motif ironed onto pocket, double breast pockets, curved pocket flaps, snap closure throughout, curved lower hemline.
Version eleven; for Sam, black and white check "scrunched" cotton, black topstitching, silver snaps.  Variations, short sleeves with a little tab with snap closure on the edge of the sleeve hem.  Shoulder tabs with snap closure.  Pocket motif.  Bias cut double breast pockets, bias cut (but the opposite way) arrownhead pocket flaps, curved lower hemline.
Version twelve; for Craig, blue shot cotton, rusty red topstitching and buttons. Variations, short sleeved summer-y version, buttons on sleeve ends, double breast pockets, flattish arrowhead pocket flaps, curved lower hemline.
Version thirteen; for Sam, navy blue corduroy, navy topstitching, brown snaps.  Variations, made it a tad bigger and longer and out of corduroy to make a jacket-y thing. Double breast pockets, deep arrowhead pocket flaps, curved lower hemline.  Contrasting beige cotton for lining the collar stand, pocket flaps and pockets.  Copied some very cool double hip pockets here that I had seen on a jacket in the surf shop.  Both my boys love these jackets btw!
Version fourteen; for Tim, beige corduroy, brown topstitching (a mistake, should have chosen matching thread...), brown snaps.  Variations, as above, with the double hip pocket thing.  Contrasting blue linen for lining the collar stand, pocket flaps and pockets.
Version fifteen; not surprisingly, I have another one cut out and awaiting my attention!  This one for me.  Stay tuned for this next one...


I hope you've enjoyed this little overview of the very versatile Burda 7767, and can appreciate why it is one of my favourite go-to's!

33 comments:

  1. You must have this traced off in every size!

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  2. Hehe, actually I have one size cut out that fits both my sons, and I've marked on it the variations that are needed to fit Craig. For my version I have to fold it back to cut out the smaller size that fits me... fiddly when you're working around the curves, but worth it!

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  3. I`m speechless ( but I can still use the keypad !) - this really beats my re-using a pattern ( about 8 times but just for PJs ).
    Anyway nothing wrong in re-using a pattern - they cost so much here - I accidently bought a couple of vogue patterns not on sale and my face must have looked strange when told the price because the salesperson commented that it was a pattern I could use lots. Finallyy learnt my lesson there. I love all your versions and love that your blokes will wear pink.

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  4. You've made some great variations with this pattern. It certainly is very versatile but then basic patterns always are. I think all sewists should have a couple of basic patterns in their library.

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  5. what a great post! It's good to see so many variations, and to know you have really had your monies worth from this pattern.

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  6. Wow! that's amazing! They are all such good variations too. I am planning to crib your diagonal button holes if and when I finally sew up the shirt I have cut out for my husband (if that's ok!)He is very keen to have 'interesting' clothes, but runs a mile if they are too 'interesting'!

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  7. Wow, those are such amazing shirts, each one unique and fabulous. Great job and thanks for the post.

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  8. Wow, everybody wins with this pattern! Nice shirts.

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  9. Oh, I love this post! Fifteen! Wow.

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  10. That's fantastic! What a bargain... money's worth out of that pattern! My favourite is the one with the yellow diagonal buttons - a great design feature that makes it special.

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  11. I couldn't believe as I scrolled down that there was another and then another...great use of the pattern. I love trying out the same pattern with different variations and seeing how far I can get. x

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  12. Very fun to see. Thanks Carolyn.

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  13. fantastic, can hardly pick a favorite. I am soooo happy when I can reuse a pattern and feel like a champion when I get to use number 5 or 6. great post.

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  14. You totally win!! This is really encouraging to me as I am very embarrassed at the number of patterns I have amassed. I now have the skills to add my own take on a basic pattern and will definitely be referring to this post in the future.

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  15. Definitely fun and inspiring to see all the versions you have made in one post. Thanks for taking the time to put it together!

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  16. What a great idea for a post! I love all the tweaks you've made that make each one unique. So what are you tracing the pattern on again to have it hold up through 15 versions? tho I suppose not all are the same size.

    My boys where pink unashamedly too. :) I think it's a great color for them.

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  17. You have really got your monies worth out of that pattern. I think that is fantastic you can use a pattern many times and make it look like so many different shirts!

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  18. Fifteen times! I bet by now this is a total breeze to sew up! :)
    I love the little variations between the shirts!

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  19. How wonderful that you have pictures of all the variations!

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  20. What well dressed and handsome fellows. I am not showing this post to anyone in my house.They might get ideas. Here I was feeling rather smug and thrifty with a few repetitions of a vogue man shirt pattern. Your variations make the pattern most versatile.

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  21. WOW you are AMAZING!! Such different looks!!! all great!

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  22. Oh I love these! That is so nice how versatile it is. My favorite is version 5 I think. I love that fabric and especially love how you switched it up on the front pockets. Amazing work Carolyn!! As always. I swear, you amaze me so much.

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  23. Amazing--in some shots the shirt looks so crisp and dressy. In others, so relaxed. The fabric you select makes a huge difference.

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  24. I'm not sure what I'm more impressed with - the fact that you made this shirt 15 times or that you got the men in your life to pose for the photoshoot.

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  25. I love your photos and one day I hope that I might be able to style a shoot that reflects all the thought and work I put into my garments! Something to aim for, in the meantime, I am totally inspired by the way you have reused this pattern. It makes me think I should really work on flogging a few working patterns. It's good to take risks, but if you want something you can actually wear, then TNT's provide that guarantee.

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  26. That must be one battered pattern! I think the most I've ever done is three versions of a pattern. Your shirts look great.

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  27. In this case TNT is not tried and tested, but maybe tested and torn! You certainly get value from your patterns.

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  28. OMG! You really sew, girl! 15!
    Kisses.

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  29. What an inspiring and educational post - thank you! It's a treat to see how material choices and small changes in the details make a shirt look totally different. I'm trying to do the same with a pants pattern for my toddler - it's been pajamas, shorts, and now corduroys for winter. Lucky for me, the main change in his size is longer legs. Show us another pattern!

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  30. Ooo, lovely all around! ESPECIALLY those jacket variations! I'm inspired. My boyfriend just landed a teaching job and I think he'll need something like this in his wardrobe. PS, your blog is amazing!

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  31. I LOVE this post! You have such a handsome family (and I always love your dog, too--what a sweet spirit). This is the one and only shirt pattern I own... which I halfway made for husband then started in on drafting one instead (for the reasons you mention--I just like having freedom with design details). I should really finish because it seems like one of those great basics.

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